DIGITAL FIELD GUIDE: RARE AND VAGRANT BIRDS OF THE MOGGILL CREEK CATCHMENT



 
BIRD SPECIES
 
 

WHERE THE BIRD FEEDS

 

FOOD TYPE
 
'FEATHER FASCINATION' REFERENCE

 

NOTES

 

Photo courtesy of Clare Richards - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Australian Masked-Owl   Ground level  Small mammals: Rodents
Rabbits
Possums
Reptiles
Birds
Insects
 
  55cm. Residents with large territories. Inhabits forests, woodlands, timbered waterways and open country on the fringe of these areas. The main requirements are tall trees with suitable hollows for nesting and roosting and adjacent areas for foraging. 
 

Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Black-breasted Button-quail   Leaf-littered ground level  Beetles 
Ants
Spiders
Centipedes 
Millipedes

Land snails 
  19cm. Rare visitor, very hard to detect. Vulnerable species, ranked as a critical priority. Prefers to feed amongst leaf litter, dry forests with dense understory, lantana. Feeds by pivoting around a stationary foot and scratching with the other foot which results in distinctive cleared circles in leaf litter called platelets which are diagnostic. 
 

Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Black-chinned Honeyeater  Canopy layer  Nectar
Honeydew
Invertebrates 
  17cm. Rare visitor. Prefers dried habitats with sparse understory. May come to the Catchment because of climate events. 


Photo taken outside Moggill Catchment

Brown Gerygone 
Brown Warbler 
Canopy layer  Insects    11cm. Rare resident. Only found in rainforest and wetter eucalypt forest. Often found in small parties. 
 

Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Buff-rumped Thornbill 
Bark Tit, Varied Thornbill 
Open ground among trees  Insects    11cm. Uncommon resident, nomadic. Prefers open forests with plenty of tree debris on the ground and some rocks. 
 

Photo courtesy of Chris Read- taken outside Moggill Catchment

Chestnut Teal   Freshwater surface  Water plants 
Snails
Beetles 
Spiders
Seeds
 
  48cm. Nomadic and affected by climate events, may turn up anywhere on fresh water, reservoir and large dams. Small dabbling duck.  
 

Photo courtesy of 
Jill and Ian Brown-taken outside Moggill Catchment


Comb-crested Jacana 
Lotusbird, Lily-trotter
  
Floating leaves of fresh-water plants  Insects
Other invertebrates  
  26cm. Common resident. Walks on floating vegetation on large bodies of water: reservoir and big dams. Best chance is at the reservoir. Female is larger than the male who raises young whom he carries on his back. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Jill and Ian Brown-taken outside Moggill Catchment


Cotton Pygmy-Goose 
(Male on left in photo) 
Freshwater surface   Seeds from water-plants
Some insects 
  38cm. Uncommon, locally nomadic, seasonal. Deeper freshwater swamps, dams, lagoons with waterlilies and other emergent water plants. Small perching duck.  
 

Photo courtesy of 
Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment


Crimson Rosella 
Red Lowry 
All levels  Seeds
Insects- eg: galls  
  37cm. Uncommon resident. The Catchment is at the extreme northern end of it distribution which extends south along the coast to SA. Its preferred habitat is the wetter forests, rainforests and riparian zones. 


Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Dusky Woodswallow 
Skimmer, 
Woodmartin

Aerial
canopy 
Flying insects
Some nectar 
  18cm. Nomadic. Found in open forests and woodlands, and may be seen along roadsides and on golf courses. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Jill and Ian Brown-taken outside Moggill Catchment


Great Crested Grebe    Water surface and diving underwater  Fish
Insects 
  55cm. Resident. Less common and larger than Australasian Grebe. Only found on reservoir as it prefers large areas of open water. Much photographed for its spectacular mating dances on the surface of the water and its striking head plumage.
 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Jill and Ian Brown-taken outside Moggill Catchment


Hooded Robin 
Male on right in photo 
On or near ground  Insects    18cm. Known vagrant in the Moggill Creek Catchment. Rarely seen. Found in lightly timbered woodland, mainly dominated by acacia and/or eucalypts. 


Photo courtesy of 
Jill and Ian Brown-taken outside Moggill Catchment


Little Egret   Shallow water  Invertebrates
Fish
Amphibians 
  65cm. Highly nomadic to find available wetlands. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Alison Stanes


Little Wattlebird    Shrub layer and canopy  Nectar
Insects
Flowers
Berries
Some seeds  
June 2016  31cm. Rare visitor. Smallest of the wattlebirds. Prefers the drier and often scrubby habitats such as banksia heaths, forests, woodlands, urban parks and gardens. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment


Pale-Yellow Robin   Mainly ground, up to mid-story  Pouncing on insects    13cm. Sedentary. Found in moist eucalypt forests, subtropical and tropical rainforests with dense vegetation, such as vine thickets 


Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Pallid Cuckoo   Ground level  Hairy caterpillars
Insects
Larvae 
  33cm. Uncommon visitor. Prefers open woodlands and grasslands; grazing land. Perches on low branches, power lines, posts. Lays its eggs in the nests of honeyeaters, whistlers and flycatchers. Found recently near Reservoir. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment


Satin Flycatcher   Canopy layer in Eucalypt forests  Flying insects in the Eucalypt canopy     
 

Photo courtesy of 
Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment


Spotted Harrier 
Smoke Hawk 
Ground level  Mainly ground birds: quail, pipits    61cm. Nomadic, responds to local conditions. Generally uncommon. Large territories. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment


White-cheeked Honeyeater  Canopy level Nectar in flower, in foliage, on bark but also insects    18cm. Uncommon Residents. Moist heath lands, wetlands and in forests or woodlands with a heath under storey. 


Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Yellow-rumped Thornbill  Ground level  Insects    13cm. Found on the ground in open habitats, such as woodlands, forests, shrublands and grasslands with some trees. 
 
Return to Catchment Field Guides