DIGITAL FIELD GUIDE: BIRD SPECIES COMMONLY FOUND IN THE MOGGILL CREEK CATCHMENT

Most photos in these lists were taken in the Catchment and most are the copyright of Ed Frazer. Supporting information is supplied by James Butler

Note: blue shaded rows indicate a dimorphic species, breeding and non-breeding or hepatic form



 1. WATER BIRDS

                                    BIRD SPECIES FORAGING SUBSTRATE FOOD TYPE
'FEATHER FASCINATION' REFERENCE

NOTES


 
Australasian Darter 
Snake-bird






Under water surface  Fish   94cm. Fairly common resident. Found in large shallow waters: reservoir and in Moggill Creek in deeper pools where there are fish. Roosts in trees and fences near the water. Another name is ‘snake bird’ because of the long-kinked neck coiled to strike.


Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - not taken in the Moggill Catchment 

Australasian Darter  
Snake-bird 


 
Australasian Grebe 
Little Grebe
Water surface and diving underwater  Small fish
Freshwater insects
 
February 2016
March 2016 
26cm. Common resident. Prefers still, shallow water:  dams not creeks. Walks poorly on land, because its legs are so far back for diving. Can be mistaken for a duckling. 


 
 Australian Pelican   On and under water surface Fish
Birds 
  1.9m. Nomadic over large areas in response to climate events. Perhaps only possible site is the Reservoir and Rafting Ground Reserve from which they can be seen flying over the Brisbane River. Feed in large shallow waters.


 
Australian Wood Duck  
Maned Duck or Goose 
 Grasslands
 
 

Grasses
Occasional insects
 
  50cm. Common resident. Not a good swimmer, nests in tree hollows, sometimes far from water. Can be found on grasslands near the riparian habitat.  
 


Australian Wood Duck  
Maned Duck or Goose 
 


Black Bittern   Shallow water Fish
Amphibians 
  66cm. Resident. Roost and nest in trees, and are found in tree-lined wetlands. Feed during the day and night. 
 


 Black Swan  Freshwater  Underwater and Emergent vegetation    1.4m Nomadic and highly dispersive. Only seen on Gold Creek Reservoir, prefers large open waters. 
 


Buff-banded Rail 
Banded Landrail, Rail  
Ground level, wet grasses  Plants
Crustaceans 
Insects 
Seeds
Fruit
Frogs

October 2014  33cm. Common resident but elusive. Prefers rank vegetation near wetlands, creeks, dams, well-vegetated urban gardens near bushland. 
 


Cattle Egret (Breeding)    Ground, grassy paddocks  Grasshoppers
Insects 
  53cm. Common resident. Prefers grazing paddocks, follows cattle, horses; woodlands, wetlands. Best chance in paddocks with cattle or horses! Looks wonderful in breeding plumage. 


 
Cattle Egret
(Non-breeding) 
  


 
Dusky Moorhen 
Waterhen 
Freshwater swamps  Aquatic plants
Insects
Frogs 
  40cm. Common resident. Found near water in natural settings – wetlands, reservoir, and dams; and in urban settings ponds, small lakes.  

 

Eastern Great Egret  
Large Egret, White Crane 
Shallow water  Fish    1m. Nomadic and fairly common, dispersive in response to climate events like droughts and floods. Prefers shallow fresh waters. Can be found at the Reservoir, dams, and wetlands. 


 
Eurasian Coot   Swimming  Aquatic plants
Insects
Frogs 
  38cm. Nomadic and dispersive. Often in large flocks. Favour large water bodies, shallow enough to have underwater and emergent vegetation. Spend most of their time on the water, mostly away from the bank.  
 


Great Cormorant 
Black Shag,
Big Black Cormorant
Under water surface  Fish
Crustaceans
Insects frogs 
  92cm. Fairly common resident. Favours large bodies of water: Reservoir or very large dams on properties. Is nomadic, moving according to rainfall.  


 
Grey Teal  Freshwater surface Water plants 
Snails
Beetles 
Spiders
Seeds
 
 
  46cm. Nomadic and affected by climate events, may turn up anywhere on fresh water, reservoir and large dams. Mainly inland, retreats to coast in numbers during drought.  



Hardhead 
White-eyed Duck
Water surface and diving underwater  Seeds
Flowers
Grasses
Sedges
Invertebrates
 
  60cm. Nomadic and affected by climate events, dispersive and irruptive. True diving duck, rarely on land. Probably only found on reservoir and bigger, deep dams. 
 


Hardhead 
 


Intermediate Egret 
Plumed Egret  
Shallow water  Fish    70cm. Nomadic and fairly common, dispersive in response to climate events. Prefers shallow fresh waters. Can be found at Reservoir, dams, wetlands. 
 

Latham's Snipe 
Australian or Japanese Snipe 
Shallow water and ground  Seeds & plant material
Worms 
Spiders 
Insects 
Molluscs
Centipedes

January 2015
Sept 2015 
31cm. Migratory wader, here in summer. They are found in any vegetation around wetlands, in sedges, grasses, lignum, reeds and rushes. Use their long bills to probe the mud. Roost by day, feed at night, mornings and evenings.  
 


Lewin's Rail 
Lewin's Water Rail 
Mud layer
wet grasses 
Crustaceans
Molluscs
Worms
Insects
 
  27cm. Very rare, dispersive. Near Threatened Species (DERM); Significant (BCC). Prefers dense vegetation in wetlands near forests: reservoir, dams, riparian zone. Very elusive and hard to observe, it rarely comes onto open ground. Seen near Reservoir in May 2012.
 
 


Little Black Cormorant 
Little Black Shag
 Under water surface Fish    64cm. Common resident. Favours large bodies of water. Only found on Reservoir, not in creeks. Fish form 99% of its diet. It observed on the water it means there are fish in the water. 


 
Little Pied Cormorant 
Shag 
Under water surface  Crustaceans
Insects
Some fish 
  64cm. Common resident. Found in shallow waters: reservoir, Moggill Creek, dams, wetlands. Roosts on trees and logs to rest after feeding with wings outstretched to dry them. Roosts at night and nests, communally. 


 
Nankeen Night-Heron 
Rufous Night-Heron   
Shallow water  Insects
Crustaceans
Fish
Amphibians
  64cm. Nomadic, in response to rainfall. Feeds at night time, roosts during the day beside water.  


 
Nankeen Night-Heron 
(Juvenile) 
 


Pacific Black Duck  
Black Duck, Brown Duck
Freshwater surface  Water plants 
Snails
Beetles 
Spiders
Seeds 
  60cm. Common resident. Found on reservoir, dams, creeks, swimming pools, public gardens. Mostly stays on water. Cannot dive, feeds by upending. 
 


Pale vented Bush-hen    Ground level, wet grasses  Aquatic plants
Insects
Frogs
  28cm. Uncommon resident. Conservation Status: Significant (BCC). Prefers tall grass in riparian zones and wetlands. Difficult to see in the grass, but does enter water and moves along streams, so can be found out in the open. Reservoir is the place.  



Plumed Whistling-Duck 
Grasslands Grass
62cm. Nomadic and dispersive. Night time they fly long distances to feed on grasslands. Day time flocks rest and sleep beside water with other waterfowls. 
 


Purple Swamphen 
Bald Coot, 
Eastern Swamphen
 
Shallow freshwater
grassy wetlands 
Soft shoots of water Plants
Frogs
Snails 
  48cm. Fairly common resident. Prefers dense wet tall grasses near water. Not easily seen until it comes out onto open ground. Has adapted to urban landscapes: lakes, parks, playing fields near shelter. 


 
Royal Spoonbill   Shallow water, less than 40cm; fresh or salt water  Freshwater fish
Shrimps in tidal flats

Other crustaceans Insects
February 2016  80cm. Nomadic, moving with the availability of habitat. Moves to the coast during droughts. 
 


Spotless Crake   Ground level, wetlands  Seeds
Fruit and leaves of Aquatic plants
Worms 

Snails 
Spiders
Beetles  
  21cm. Cryptic resident. Freshwater wetlands with dense margins. More often heard than seen. 


 
White-faced Heron 
Blue Crane  
Shallow water  Fish    70cm. Common resident, locally nomadic. Found in many natural and urban habitats: creeks, wetlands, pools, dams, fishponds. Often seen in flight or near ponds in Moggill creek. 

 

White-necked Heron 
Pacific Heron 
Shallow water Fish    1.06m. Locally nomadic and fairly common. Prefers shallow fresh waters. Can be found at Reservoir, dams, wetlands. 


 
Yellow-billed Spoonbill   Shallow fresh water  Freshwater insects and
their larvae
 
  92cm. Nomadic. Freshwater wetlands, dams, lagoons and swamps, and sometimes in dry pastures, but rarely uses saltwater wetlands. It can use much smaller areas of water than the Royal Spoonbill. 
   

2. LAND BIRDS


 
BIRD SPECIES
 
 

FORAGING SUBSTRATE

 

FOOD TYPE
 
'FEATHER FASCINATION' REFERENCE

 

NOTES


 

Australasian Figbird 
Green or Yellow Figbird, Banana-Bird 
Canopy level




Fruit
Other plant parts
  30cm. Common resident, but nomadic in search of fruiting trees. Very noisy and in large numbers when a big fig tree is fruiting. Found in rainforests, eucalypt forests, riparian zones, backyards near forests. Male has red skin around eye.  

 

Australasian Figbird 
 


Australian Pipit   Ground  Insects
Seeds 
  19cm. Rare in Catchment, but because of their widespread distribution, conspicuous behavioural displays, and their presence in open, often agricultural landscapes and on the sides of roads, pipits are one of the best-recognised small birds.
 


 
Australian Brush-Turkey 
Scrub Turkey 
Forest floor  Seeds
Grain
Fruit
Invertebrates 
  70cm. Common resident. Males build a large mound to incubate eggs from a number of females with environmental microbial heat. Young dig their way out of the mound and are then on their own with no parental involvement. 


 
Australian Hobby  
Little Falcon
Aerial  Birds    35cm. Uncommon visitor maybe driven by climate events. Found in woodlands, grasslands, wetlands, and sometimes well-treed urban areas. Very fast, dark-headed falcon; very visible when hunting as it relentlessly pursues other birds. 
 


 Australian King Parrot  Canopy level  Seeds
Fruits
Nectar
Flowers 
  44cm. Common resident, dispersive. Found in all natural habitats and in urban backyards and parks. Moves to wherever there are suitable trees or shrubs with fruits, flowers and seeds. 


 
Australian King Parrot  


 
Australian Magpie 
Black-backed Magpie 
Open ground far from cover  Ground dwelling invertebrates
Insects
Worms 
April 2016
October 2016 
44cm. Very common resident. Found at the edges of most forests and in clearings. Very common in the suburbs where there is open grasslands for them to feed. Wonderful singer. 


 
Australian Owlet-Nightjar
Moth Owl 
Ground to mid-level foliage at night  Nocturnal flying insects
Insects on ground Foliage 
  24cm. Resident but difficult to detect. Roosts by day in entrance to tree hollow. Found in all habitats: woodlands, forests, riparian zones with suitable trees. Can be found near Reservoir. Very strange looking bird: large eyes and cat’s head! 


 
Australian Reed-Warbler 
Clamorous Reed-Warbler,
Reedbird, Water Sparrow
 
Reeds in ponds and water courses Insects    17cm. Sedentary while habitat is suitable. Very loud, raucous call.  
 


Australian White Ibis 
Sacred Ibis 
Ground level  Small vertebrates Insects    76cm. Nomadic and fairly common, dispersive. Forages in wetlands, paddocks, lawns, garbage tips, urban parks and gardens.

Ed's note: Take a close look at this photo! It depicts an Ibis eating a cane toad. Ed Frazer, the photographer, watched the Ibis for about 5 minutes, in which time it made three trips to the dam to wash the toad, presumably to wash off the poisonous secretions. The toad was alive through most of this. The Ibis adjusted the toad's position in its beak all the time - perhaps it was making it secrete poison so it could be washed off. It swallowed the whole thing and then just went on feeding along the edge of the pond. Quite remarkable!




 
Azure Kingfisher   Shallow, slow moving or still water  Small crustaceans
Aquatic insects 
  19cm. Common resident. Can only be found near water, it is a water kingfisher. It seeks prey from a perch about 1 m above the creek or pond. Usually travels by flying above the water. To find it sit beside Moggill Creek and wait and listen and watch. 


 
Barred Cuckoo-shrike 
Yellow-eyed Cuckoo-shrike 
Canopy  Insects    26cm. Summer breeding migrant. Uncommon. The Reservoir is specified as one of the best place in Brisbane to see it. Note startling yellow eye.  


 
Bar-shouldered Dove 
Pandanus Pigeon 
Ground level  Grains
Seeds of grasses
Herbs
Sedges 
  30cm. Common resident. Found in woodland with a grassy understorey and in nearby open areas, usually near water. Best chance near reservoir. 
 


Bell Miner 
Bellbird 
Canopy layer  Insects
Nectar 
December 2014  19cm. Common resident in suitable habitat. Colonies are stationary, and loudly announce their presence with their constant diurnal calling. They are very cryptic in the canopy, and always on the move. Colonies are on Gap Creek Rd just before parking lot, and near the MCCG cottage on Gold Creek Rd. 


 
Black-faced Cuckoo-shrike 
Blue-jay, Shufflewings,
Summerbird
 
Canopy level  Invertebrates
some plant material
  36cm. Very common summer migrant from Papua New Guinea; but some remain for the winter.  Found in rainforests, eucalypt forests, woodlands and riparian zones. Diagnostically, always shuffles its wings on landing on a branch. 


 
Black-faced Monarch   Mid layer and canopy level  Insects from foliage    19cm. Common Summer breeding migrant from PNG. Look for it is rainforests and eucalypt forests, it is often in the foliage from the mid-level to the canopy. 
 

Photo courtesy of Jill and Ian Brown - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Black Kite 
Fork-tailed Kite, 
Kite Hawk
  
 Ground level Lizards
Small mammals 
Insects, especially grasshoppers
Also a scavenger  
  55cm. Nomadic. Found in a great variety of habitats, from timbered watercourses to open plains. More normally seen in small groups, it may form huge flocks of many thousands of birds, especially during grasshopper plagues. Most numerous species of raptor in the world.  


 
Black-shouldered Kite   Ground level  Rodents
Mice
Grasshoppers 
  38cm. Nomadic: treed grasslands and on farms, along roads, and in vacant waste lands of urban and coastal areas. It prefers to hunt during the day, particularly early morning and late afternoon, often hovering with its wings held upright in a V-shape, before dropping down and grabbing prey with its talons. 


 
Blue-faced Honeyeater   Arboreal all  Arthropods
Nectar
Fruit 
June 2013
April 2017 
32cm. Common resident, more so in suburbs than in the forests. Contests its territories with the Noisy Miners.  
 

Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Brahminy Kite 
Red-backed Kite 
Ground level  Fish
Frogs
Rodents
Reptiles
Insects
 
  51cm. Nomadic and rare visitor. Found in open forests near water, riparian zone. Often seen soaring above, distinctive chocolate coloured body, white head. 
 


Brown Cuckoo-Dove 
Brown or Pheasant Pigeon 
Canopy layer  Fruit
Berries
Seeds 
  43cm. Common & nomadic. Found in rainforest trees carrying fruit. Can be approached when feeding. Moves to wherever trees are fruiting. Has a preference for thickets of wild tobacco. Many near reservoir. 
 

Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Brown Falcon   Open grasslands and woodlands   Small mammals
Insects
Reptiles
Small birds
 
  50cm. Common resident. Perches on poles and other structures. Swoops down to take prey. 
 


Brown Goshawk 
Australian Goshawk 
Aerial, ground level  Small mammals 
Birds

Reptiles
Large insects 
  50cm. Common resident. Prefers open forests, woodlands, riparian zones; sometimes in urban parks. Has a distinctive “frowning” facial pattern. 


 
Brown Honeyeater   All levels of trees and shrubs  Nectar
Insects 
  15cm. Common resident. Found in most forests and woodlands, but has adapted to parks and gardens where its constant call announces it presence. Look for birds in isolated trees in parks and streets. 


 
Brown Quail 
Silver, Swamp Quail 
Grasslands  Seeds
Green shoots
Insects 
  22cm. Common resident. Not easily seen. Prefers dense grasslands, often on the edges of open forests & wetlands. Best chance is near Reservoir. 
 

 
Brown Thornbill   Mid-level, forest understory  Insects    10cm. Very common resident. Always on the move, difficult to study carefully. Lovely call given often and near your ear because of the level at which they feed. Often found in multi-species groups: fantails, whistlers, finches, thornbills. 


 
Brush Cuckoo 
 
Perches to take prey in flight or on ground  Insects, especially hairy caterpillars  January 2013
January 2016 
23cm. Fairly common summer breeding migrant from Papua New Guinea. Prefers rainforests, forests, woodlands, riparian zones. Has a strong call that can be heard often, the bird is harder to see.  


 
Brush Cuckoo (Hepatic) 


 
Bush Stone-curlew 
Bush Thick-knee, Weeloo, Wilaroo
Ground at night time  Insects
Molluscs
Lizards
Seeds 
July 2016  59cm. Common resident. In the bush, prefer open woodland and forest, in the day roost cryptically amongst leaf litter and dry grasses; in the urban landscape they breed in car parks, grassy parks. At night as they feed they emit eerie calls. 



Channel-billed Cuckoo 
Stormbird, Fig Hawk,
Hornbill
Canopy specialist Fruits, particularly native figs
Seeds
Insects
Baby birds
November 2012
December 2012
January 2013
January 2016
66cm. Common summer migrant cuckoo, down from Papua New Guinea. Calls loudly for much of the day and night. Seeks fruiting trees in rainforests, woodlands, riparian zones, urban parks and streets. Eggs and young cared for by crows, pied currawong. Look for them being chased by crows.



Chestnut-breasted Mannikin 
Ground layer Grass seeds, usually on the stalk rather than from the ground  January 2017  13cm. Locally nomadic. Found in reed beds, long grasses, swamps and mangroves. 



Cicadabird 
Canopy Insects 26cm. Summer breeding migrant from PNG. Heard more easily than seen. Male and female are very different colours. Its loud ventriloquistic call resembles the forest cicadas.
 


Cicadabird  


 
Collared Sparrowhawk   Aerial  Birds    40cm. Fairly common resident. Found in open forests, woodlands, riparian zone. Often seen pursuing its prey in fast flight through forest. Best chances near reservoir. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Mike Ford

Common Bronzewing   Mostly near ground  Grain
Seeds  
  36cm. Rare visitor mainly due to climate events. Found in open woodland. Very few found in the Catchment. Best chance is in cleared, open landscapes with seeding native grasses. 


 
Common Myna 
Indian Myna, Mynah 
All  Insects
Food scraps
Fruit 
  25cm. Feral species, introduced into Melbourne in 1860’s and has extended northwards. Aggressive. Very successful in the urban environment.  
 


Crested Pigeon 
Topknot 
Ground  Grain
Seeds 
  34cm. Common resident. Can be found in many parks, in urban landscapes, backyards. Has a specialised feather in its wing that makes a distinctive sound when it takes off. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Jill and Ian Brown


Crested shrike-tit  Bark  Insects
Spiders
Fruits
Seeds
 
  19cm. Fairly common resident. Found in most of the habitats, especially rainforests & eucalypt forests. Tears at the bark noisily in search of insects. Look near the Reservoir.  

 

Dollarbird   Aerial  Insects    30cm. Summer breeding migrant from Papua New Guinea. Prefers rainforests, forests, riparian zones and urban development close to forests. “Dollar” bird because it has two white round splotches on its wings in flight. 



Double-barred Finch 
Banded or Black-ringed Finch 
Grass layer
shrub layer 
Seeds on ground
Insects 
  11cm. Fairly common resident, but nomadic in search of seeding grasses. Found on grasslands, parks, paddocks, near water.  Always in a flock and keep moving. 


 
Eastern Koel 
Cooee, Rainbird

Canopy specialist Fruit  November 2012
December 2012
January 2013
January 2016 

46cm. Common summer migrant cuckoo, down from Papua New Guinea. Calls loudly for much of the day. Not easily seen. Seeks fruiting trees in rainforests, woodlands, riparian zones, urban parks and streets. Sexes are strikingly different. Eggs and young cared for by mudlarks and friarbirds. 
 


Eastern Koel  
Cooee, Rainbird 


 
Eastern Spinebill   Shrub layer Nectar
Honeydew
Invertebrates 
  17cm. Winter altitudinal migrant, from high altitudes to low altitudes. Prefers forests, woodlands and flowering shrubs in gardens near forests. Are numerous in gardens with grevilleas flowering. Best place is near Reservoir or in your own garden if it has winter natives flowering. 
 


Eastern Whipbird   Low dense shrub layer  Invertebrates    31cm. Very common resident, and well known to everyone. The well-known call is a duetting song where the male’s “whip” lash is responded to by the female  with a simple two note call that is uttered so as to appear continuous with the male’s. 
 


Eastern Yellow Robin   Ground layer  Pouncing on insects, spiders and other anthropods  August 2013  16cm. Very common resident. Found in eucalypt forests, rainforests, prefers gulleys. Requires small diameter trees, as it perches sideways and drops to the ground on prey. Can be found are Reservoir and gulleys at Gap Creek. Pounces on prey from a low perch, usually on trunk. 


 
Emerald Dove 
Emerald Pigeon,
Green Dove,
Green-Winged Pigeon
 
Ground under rainforest trees  Fallen fruit
Seeds 
  28cm. Locally nomadic. Unlike other fruit-eating birds, this dove’s gut destroys the seeds that they eat which prohibits seed dispersal. Best chances in rainforests near reservoir, but moves through riparian zones. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment


Fairy Martin 
Bottle Swallow
 
High aerial  Flying insects    13cm. Migratory. Moves north to New Guinea for winter. Colony bird: usually hunts and nests in large flocks.  


 
Fan-tailed Cuckoo   Perches to take prey in flight or on ground  Insects  January 2013
January 2016 
27cm. Common resident, partially migratory. Prefers rainforests, forests, woodlands. Best place is around Reservoir. Has a beautiful voice that is often heard. When observed usually flies a few metres and then perches and looks back at observer.  


 
Forest Kingfisher   Ground level  Insects
Worms
Small reptiles
April 2015  23cm. Common summer breeding migrant. Best place to find it is in forest around Reservoir. Prefers woodlands, riparian zones, it is a forest not a water kingfisher, its prey are land animals.  
 


Galah   Open ground level  Seeds
Shoots
Roots
Insects
Flowers 
  38cm. Common resident. Found in open woodlands, riparian zone, urban parks, playing fields, on power lines, fences. Appears to go west in the morning and returns east in the afternoon. Can be seen almost anywhere.  
 

Photo courtesy of 
Mike Ford

Glossy Black-Cockatoo 
Casuarina Cockatoo
Canopy layer  Very restricted diet of casuarina cones from selected trees    51cm. Resident, but can travel large distances.  
 


Golden-headed Cisticola 
Barleybird, TailorBird
Grass layer
shrub layer
Invertebrates    12cm. Fairly common resident. Found in tall grasses and rushes beside wetlands. Perches to sing from highest stalks. Not difficult to see because they come out of the long grass to sing. 


 
 Golden Whistler  Lower and mid layer of forest  Insects
Spiders
Other small arthropods
Some berries 
May 2017 

19cm. Very common resident, with an influx of others in winter which noticeably increases the numbers and observability. Found in rainforests and Eucalypt forests. Call is a beautiful series of whistles! 

 

 Golden Whistler 
 


Green Catbird   Canopy  Mainly fruits
Figs
Flowers
Insects
Millipedes 
  32cm. Resident in more Western parts. Prefers fruiting and flowering rainforest trees, and large trees in deep gullies. Best place is the wetter, thicker-treed areas around Reservoir.  


 
Grey Butcherbird 
Silver-backed Butcherbird 
All levels but mainly ground  Insects
Small birds
Lizards
Eggs 
May 2016  30cm. Very common resident. Found at the edges and on the ridges of most forests. Very common in the suburbs. Its dawn calling is spectacular. 


 
 Grey Fantail  Canopy levels  Flying insects    17cm. Autumn, winter altitudinal migrant. Feeds on flying insects, usually higher in the canopy than the Rufous Fantail. Often found with other small birds in a feeding group.  
 


Grey Goshawk 
White Goshawk 
Aerial, ground level  Birds
Small mammals
Reptiles

Insects 
  54cm. Common resident. Near Threatened species. Found in open forests, woodlands, riparian zone. Can be very white in colour and is known to mix with flocks of sulphur-crested cockatoos to camouflage itself so it can prey on ducks and stilts. 
 


Grey Shrike-thrush  Ground level and mid layer  Insects
Spiders
Mice
Frogs
Lizards
Birds 
  26cm. Common resident. Searches for food on the ground, generally around fallen logs, and on the limbs and trunks of trees. Best voice in the Eucalypt forest, varied and tonal.  
 


Horsfield's Bronze-Cuckoo   Ground level or mid level of trees  Insects
Caterpillars 
January 2013
January 2016 
17cm. Uncommon Summer migrant, down from Papua New Guinea or northern Australia. Prefers the open woodland. Not seen at the Reservoir in the last ten years. More often heard than seen, has a lovely repetitive call. 
 


Large-billed Scrubwren   All layers, but not on forest floor  Insects    13cm. Very common resident. Can be found in forests on trees, in foliage, climbing on trunk and branches, moves constantly. Best place is at Reservoir, where it is as common as White-browed Scrubwren but foraging much higher than the latter.  
 


Laughing Kookaburra  
Laughing Jackass
All levels  Small animals
Insects
Eggs 
  47cm. Common resident. Can be found almost everywhere. Each group broadcasts its territory by chorus calling. 
 


Leaden Flycatcher 
Blue Flycatcher, Frogbird 
Mid level to top of canopy  Flying insects
Insects on foliage 
  16cm. Summer breeding migrant from PNG and north-east Queensland. Prefers open eucalypt forests and woodlands. When it lands on a branch it flicks its tail in a way that traces out a horizontal figure of eight. Found near Reservoir in forests and in gulleys leading off from Gap Creek Reserve.  
 


Leaden Flycatcher  
Blue Flycatcher, Frogbird 
 


Lewin's Honeyeater   Mid layer and canopy  Fruit
Nectar
Insects
Invertebrates
Honeydew 
  22cm. Very common resident. Can be found in most habitats, and comes freely into urban backyards. Most honeyeaters utilize nectar for energy but they all need insects as a source of protein. The Lewin’s call is the most common forest bird call in the Catchment. 
 


Little Bronze-Cuckoo   All levels  Caterpillars
Beetles
Flies
Ants 
January 2013
January 2016 
15cm. Spring, Summer migrant. Eggs and your cared for by gerygones. Prefer dryer open forests and woodlands. 
 


Little Corella   Ground level  Grains
Grass seeds
Bulbs
Roots 
  39cm. Sedentary and nomadic. Very common, very widespread. All types of habitats across the width of Australia. Form large flocks. Need water every day. 
 


Little Eagle   Ground, shrub and canopy levels  Rabbits
Other live mammals
Insects 
  55cm. Adult birds are mainly sedentary, while the young birds disperse. It tends to inhabit open woodland, grassland and arid regions, shunning dense forest. Forages on the wing or from a high exposed perch. 


 
Little Friarbird   Canopy layer  Nectar
Honeydew
Invertebrates 
  29cm. Uncommon resident. Nomadic in search of blossoms, calls often as it feeds.  
 


Little Grassbird   Ground layer
shrub layer 
Insects
Spiders
Other anthropods 
  15cm. Nomadic to sedentary. Locally common.  Found in swamps and marshes, preferring thick reed beds. Vegetation on drains in Catchment.  


 
Little Lorikeet   Canopy layer  Flowers
Fruit 
  16cm. Common resident, much less obvious than the Rainbow and Scaly Lorikeets. Call is very high pitch. Found in most forest habitats and has adapted to urban treed landscapes.  
 


Little Shrike-thrush 
Rufous Strike-thrush 
Ground level and mid layer  Inspects
Spiders 
  19cm. Common resident. Prefers the wetter forests: rainforests, Eucalypt forest, riparian zones with dense foliage. Wonderful voice. When observed it does not flee.  


Photo courtesy of 
Chris Read

 
Long-billed Corella   Ground level  Grass seeds
Grain crops
Bulbs and roots
Insects
 
  41cm. Adults sedentary, young dispersive. Grasslands and grassy woodlands. Much less common than the Little Corella. Has a “red slash” across the throat. 


 
Magpie-lark 
Mudlark, Peewee, Pewit 
Open ground far from cover  Invertebrates 
Seeds 
Small vertebrates 
  30cm. Very common resident. Can be found wherever there are trees near water, and mud to make the nest.  
 


Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo 
Pink Cockatoo 
Open ground level  Seeds of grasses and herbaceous plants
Fruit
Roots
Bulbs
Insects 
  40cm. Resident. Nest in hollow trees. Open forests. (The individuals present in the Catchment are certainly the descendants of escapees. But the present flock is at least 20 years old and has been resident for that period.) 


Photo courtesy of 
Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment


Marbled Frogmouth 
Plumed frogmouth
Ground level  Nocturnal insects    48cm. Resident. Found in deep, wet, gulleys in lowland wet forests. Roosts during the day, hunting and feeding at night. Hunt from low perches, stumps of low branches. 


 
Masked Lapwing 
Masked Plover,
Spurwinged Plover
 
Open ground level  Invertebrates  June 2017  38cm. Very common resident in open bushland, edges of reservoir and dams, and in urban parks, playing fields, etc. Can be seen, and heard, almost anywhere. Known to swoop people who come too close during the breeding season, they lay eggs on bare ground. 
 


Mistletoebird 
Mistletoe Flowerpecker
 
Canopy level  Mistletoe fruit
Nectar 
  11cm. Common resident. Nomadic in search for fruit. Found in any forest that supports the mistletoe plant. Digests the fleshy outer fruit parts and excretes the sticky seeds onto branches. Look in the canopy when mistletoe fruiting, revealed by call. 
 


Mistletoebird  
 

Photo courtesy of 
Mike Ford

Musk Lorikeet   Canopy layer  Flowers
Fruit 
  23cm. Drought induced visitor, uncommon, nomadic, dispersive. Was last seen in great numbers in the Catchment in the 2009 drought, which brought them from the drier forests they prefer to the moister coast.
 


 
Noisy Friarbird 
Leatherhead 
Canopy layer  Nectar
Honeydew
Eggs
Baby birds
Invertebrates
 
August 2017
35cm. Common resident. Nomadic in search of forest blossoms. As it name implies it is very noisy wherever it is and its movements can be easily tracked. 
 


Noisy Miner 
Mickey, Soldierbird 
All layers  Nectar
Honeydew
Invertebrates 
October 2016  27cm. Common resident in urban settings, in narrow riparian zones, and on the edges of forests. Their aggressive behaviour towards small woodland birds is well known. They will usually only share their territory with the large black and white birds: magpies, butcherbirds, currawongs. 
 


Noisy Pitta 
Buff-breasted Pitta 
Forest floor  Insects
Woodlice
Worms
Snails
Berries
Fruit 
  21cm. Common resident, but not easily seen. Prefers wetter, darker rainforest and wet eucalypt forest floors. Most recent reports are from around the Reservoir. If found, it allows careful observation as it feeds in litter. 
 


Olive-backed Oriole   Canopy  Fruit
Insects
Seeds
Nectar 
Sept 2016  28cm. Very common resident. Found in rainforests, eucalypt forests and woodlands and riparian zones. Calls often in breeding season. Can be found with figbirds on fruiting trees. Very strong mimic. Bill is bright red. Usually alone. 
 


Oriental Cuckoo   Grass level, trunk, low branches  Hairy caterpillars  January 2013
January 2016 
33cm. Very rare summer non-breeding migrant, breeds in and north of Japan. Prefers rainforests, forests and riparian zone. 
 


Oriental Cuckoo 
(Hepatic) 
 


Pacific Barn Owl 
Screech Owl, White Owl 
Ground level  Small mammals, mainly rodents and birds
Some insects
Frogs
Lizards 
  40cm. Nomadic. Open woodlands, grasslands; farms; towns. Very uncommon in the Catchment. 
 


Pacific Baza 
Crested Hawk 
Canopy and aerial  Stick insects
Frogs
Grubs
Reptiles
Small mice 
April 2013  45cm. Common breeding resident. Only hawk found in well-treed urban areas. Otherwise in open forests, woodlands, riparian zones. Can be found throughout the Catchment; lovely to watch feeding dismembered stick insects to young. 
 


Painted Button-quail   Leaf-littered ground level   Seeds
Fruit
Insects 
  19cm. Fairly common resident. Prefer open, dry woodland with fallen timber on the ground. Foraging leaves platelets, which indicates their presence. Are seen more readily than the previous button-quail. 
 


Pale-headed Rosella   All layers, ground to canopy  Seeds
Fruit
Grasses
Flowers
Herbs
Berries
Nectar
Insects
 
 
October 2015  32cm. Common resident. Prefers open habitats, grasslands and woodlands, but can be found in forest. Has adapted to urban settings and can be found in grassy reserves, clearings, orchards. 


 
Paradise Riflebird 
Female or juvenile male
Forest floor to high in the canopy  On trunks and branches for insects, spiders and centipedes
Fruit 
  30cm. Rare visitor: found in subtropical and temperate rainforests, mostly in mountains and foothills, and adjoining wetter eucalypt forests, like the west of the Catchment. 


 
Peaceful Dove   Ground level  Small grass seeds sedges
Small insects 
  21cm. Common resident. They need to drink at least twice a day, so prefer woodlands near water, riparian habitats, parks and gardens, Reservoir. Has a call that is very distinctive and very loud, and often used. 


 
Peregrine Falcon
Black-cheeked Falcon 
Aerial  Birds,:pigeons and ducks    47cm. Uncommon visitor maybe driven by climate events. Prefers cliffs and gorges, steep terrain, which it even finds in the middle of Brisbane on tall buildings. Famous throughout the world for its speed and power, and general all round magnificence. 


 
Pheasant Coucal 
(Non Breeding)
Cane Pheasant, 
Swamp Pheasant
 
Ground and lower layers of trees  Insects 
Small vertebrates
Lizards
Birds 
  70cm. Common resident, well adapted to the urban landscape, visiting house backyards, crossing roads, wandering across lawns; also, found in the Catchment forests, and around the reservoir. 
 

 
Pheasant Coucal 
(Breeding) 


 
Pied Butcherbird   All levels but mainly ground  Small reptiles
Frogs and birds large Insects 
  36cm. Very common resident. Found at the edges and on the ridges of most forests. Very common in the suburbs. Its dawn calling is spectacular. 


 
Pied Currawong   All layers of forest and on the ground  Fruit
Vertebrates
Invertebrates 
October 2016  50cm. Very common resident. In most forests and in urban settings: parks, picnic grounds, reserves. 


Photo courtesy of
Chris Read

 
Powerful Owl   Canopy level  Ringtail Possum
Great Glider
Tawny Frogmouths Cockatoos 
  66cm. Fairly common resident. Vulnerable species in Queensland. Wonderfully loud call can be heard at night. Roost cryptically in day often with prey in its talons; but can be revealed by alarm calls of small birds. Prefers forested gullies and ridges, hilly woodlands but also city parks. Australia’s largest owl: 66cm high.
 

 

Rainbow Bee-eater 
Rainbow Bird
Aerial  Flying insects
Bees and wasps
Dragonflies
Beetles
Butterflies 
December 2013  28cm. Fairly common dispersive resident. Prefers open woodland habitats; needs open ground suitable for burrows in which to nest. Can be seen in large flocks feeding on the wing calling in a wonderful chorus. “Rainbow” because of it multi-coloured feathering. 
 


Rainbow Lorikeet   Canopy layer  Nectar 
Pollen 
Fruit 
Seeds 
June 2014  32cm. Very common resident but nomadic in search of flowering eucalypts. Can be seen and heard almost everywhere at any time. Has adapted to the urban landscape, congregating in the evening on certain street trees, making a racket! 


 
Red-backed Fairy-wren  Open grassland layer  Insects
Seeds 
February 2013
April 2014
May 2014 
13cm. Common resident. Require tall grass. They spend most of the cooler parts of their day foraging in grass 60%; then preening/loafing in thorny shrub 17%; then being vigilant in trees 14%. Smallest Fairy-wren.


 
Red-backed Fairy-wren 
And young males
 


Red-browed Finch   Ground and shrub layer  Seeds
Insects 
March 2013  12cm. Common resident. Found in groups in open forests gulleys, moving rapidly through the shrub layer. Wings made an audible noise when they take flight. The male courts female with a large (12cm) green grass stalk held horizontally in his beak. 


 
Red-capped Robin    Visually scanning from a perch, it darts out and back to take prey from the ground, off a tree trunk, leaf or branch

Insects
Spiders 
  12cm. Irregular visitor to the Catchment, probably driven by climate events. Main distribution is West of the Great Divide, extending over to WA. First seen and photographed in the Catchment in September 2017. Only the male has the unmistakable "red-cap"; the female is mostly brown. Smallest of the three "red" robins that can be found in Brisbane. Its habitat includes drier scrubs and woodlands, It does not visit gardens so its distribution has been modified by urbanisation.

 

Image courtesy of Tom Tarrant - not taken in the Moggill Catchment 

 Red-capped Robin 


Image courtesy of Chris Reid - not taken in the Moggill Catchment
 
Regent Bowerbird 

Canopy  Fruit
Berries
Insects 
  30cm. Resident in more Western parts. Prefers fruiting and flowering rainforest trees, and large trees in deep gullies. Best place is the wetter, thicker treed areas around Reservoir. Feeds on wild tobacco fruit. 
 


Regent Bowerbird 
Juvenile male or female


 
Restless Flycatcher 
Scissors Grinder,
Dish Washer
 
Mid-level canopy  Flying insects
Spiders
Centipedes 
December 2016  22cm. Uncommon resident, partly nomadic. Reveals itself with its famous “Scissors Grinder” call. Found in open Eucalypt forests and woodlands. 


 
 Rose Robin  Low to mid layer  Insects    13cm. Fairly common winter migrant. Found in gulleys in rainforests and eucalypt forests and in riparian zones. Can be found at Reservoir and in gulleys off clearing at Gap Creek Reserve. 
 


Rose Robin  


 
Rose-Crowned Fruit Dove 
Red-Crowned Fruit Dove 
Canopy level  Fruits
Insects 
March 2017  25cm. Nomadic and dispersive in search of food trees. Feeds on fruiting trees in rainforests, adjacent eucalypt forests & woodlands. Look near Reservoir. 


 
Rufous Fantail   Low to mid layer  Insects    Summer breeding altitudinal migrant. Goes back to the hills in winter, and as it leaves, the Grey Fantails arrive. 
 


Rufous Songlark   Ground layer  Insects
Spiders
Other arthropods 
  17cm. Favours open grassland, grassy open woodland, and farmed land. 


 
Rufous Whistler   Canopy layer  Arthropods    18cm. Very common resident. Found in open Eucalypt forests and woodlands. More often on ridges. 
 


Rufous Whistler  



Russet-tailed Thrush   Ground, forest floor  Insects    27cm. Uncommon resident. Found on floor of rainforests, eucalypt forests with leaf-litter and debris on the floor. Cryptically coloured to be very hard to detect in leaf-litter. Best chance is around reservoir in closed forests.
 
 


Sacred Kingfisher   Aerial and ground layer  Lizards
Frogs
Worms
Beetles
Bugs
Spiders
Grasshoppers
 

April 2015  23cm. Common summer breeding migrant, but some remain for the winter. Can be found in forest around Reservoir, but also other forest habitats on ridges. Prefers woodlands, riparian zones, it is a forest not a water kingfisher, its prey are land animals. 


Photo courtesy of 
Mike Ford - taken outside Moggill Catchment


Satin Bowerbird  

Canopy  Fruits
Insects 
July 2013
February 2016 
32cm. Common resident. The male bowerbird is solitary and builds famous bower with blue decorations. Only female builds nest, incubates eggs & raises young.  Best chances near reservoir, prefers rainforest. 



 
Satin Bowerbird  
Juvenile male or female 
 


Scaly-Breasted Lorikeet   Canopy layer  Nectar 
Pollen 
Fruit 
Seeds 
June 2014  24cm. Very common resident but nomadic in search of flowering eucalypts. Less obvious and fewer in number to the Rainbow Lorikeet, and less comfortable in the urban setting. 
 


Scarlet Honeyeater   Canopy layer  Nectar
Honeydew
Invertebrates
 
  11cm. Very common resident, with some increased migration in Spring. Found in big numbers high in the canopy feeding on eucalypt flowers. Often revealed by their calls. 



Scarlet Honeyeater  


 
Shining Bronze-Cuckoo   All levels  Caterpillars
Beetles
Flies
Ants 
January 2013
January 2016 
18cm. Common Summer migrant, down from Papua New Guinea or northern Australia; a few remain here as well. Eggs and young cared for by thornbills, wrens and flycatchers. Prefer rainforest, open forest, gardens. 


 
Silvereye 
White-eye, Waxeye,
Grape-eater
 
All layers mainly high in canopy  Insects
Jumping spiders
Fruit 
August 2015  13cm. Very common resident, but nomadic. Found in most forests and in suburban trees. Usually in a flock, and travel quickly through the canopy of the forest, calling often. 


Image courtesy of Tom Tarrant - not taken in the Moggill Catchment

Southern Boobook 
Mopoke, Morepork 
Ground level  Small birds
Rats
Mice
Moths
Grasshoppers 
  36cm. Common resident, easily heard at night almost anywhere, but difficult to see when it roosts in daytime. Its roost can be revealed by alarm calls of small birds. Can be found in forests, but also in urban settings. Quite a small owl.
 


 
Spangled Drongo   Aerial sallying and canopy layer  Grubs
Fying insects
Fruit
Nectar 
  32cm. Common summer breeding migrant, wintering in PNG. Some stay for winter. Found in rainforests and Eucalypt forests. Very noisy birds, calling often, mimic. 
 


Speckled Warbler   Ground level, grasses  Insects
Seeds 
  13cm. Rare resident. Look for them on the ground, usually in pairs. In the Catchment, they prefer the drier ridges with grasses and rocks under the forest trees. 
 


Spectacled Monarch   Lower and mid layers  Insects below the canopy in foliage, tree trunks    16cm. Common summer breeding migrant from north-eastern Queensland. Can be found in mid-layers of rainforests and gulleys in Eucalypt forests. 
 


Spotted Turtle Dove 
Turtle Dove, Spotted Dove 
Ground layer  Seeds
Grains 
  32cm. Common resident. Feral species. Found in urbanised landscapes: streets, parks, gardens and open woodlands. Introduced in 1860’s. 


 
Spotted Pardalote 
Diamond Bird 
Canopy layer
leaf gleaners 
Insects, especially psyllids
sugary exudates from leaves 
July 2014  10cm. Common resident with some winter migration that boosts numbers. Pardalotes are more common where trees are mature. Call is strong and distinctive and often heard in the forest. 


Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment
 
Spotted Quail-thrush   Ground layer  Invertebrates in leaf litter    28cm. Rare Resident, hard to detect. On the ground it is cryptic; it flushes readily and has a wide range of highly audible calls. 
 


Square-tailed Kite   Outer edges at canopy level  Birds, especially honeyeaters
Insects 
  56cm. Uncommon resident. Near threatened species. Prefers tall trees in woodlands, open forests and riparian zone. Difficult to find. 
 


Straw-necked Ibis   Ground level  Small vertebrates
Insects 
  76cm. Nomadic and common, dispersive. Forages in wetlands, paddocks, woodlands, lawns, garbage tips, urban parks and gardens. 



Striated Pardalote 
Pickwick, Wittachew, 
Chip-Chip
 
Canopy layer
Leaf gleaners 
Insects and their larvae  September 2017  12cm. Common resident with some winter migration that boosts numbers. Striated more common than Spotted Pardalote. Call is very common in urban areas as they are not dislodged by Noisy Miners. Difficult to see birds as they are small & high in canopy, and fly from canopy to canopy.
 
 

Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment 

Striated Thornbill   Canopy  Insects    10cm. Common resident. Prefers wetter eucalypt forests and woodlands. Best chance near Reservoir. 
 


Striped Honeyeater   Canopy layer  Nectar
Honeydew
Invertebrates 
  23cm. Fairly common resident. Prefers drier forest habitats. Often found in parties that call regularly which can lead you to them.  


 
Sulphur-Crested 
Cockatoo 
White Cockatoo 
All levels, ground to canopy  Seeds of native trees Pinecones
Seeds of ground plants
Insects 
  51cm. Common resident. Can be seen and heard almost everywhere at any time.  Locally nomadic in search of seeding trees and seeding grasses. 


 
Superb Fairy-wren 
Blue Wren, Jenny Wren 
Open ground around trees and shrubs  Insects
Seeds 
April 2014
May 2014 

14cm. Resident. Least common of the three fairy wrens. Prefers dense low cover in most habitats, including urban habitats: parks, reserves, gardens. 
 

 
Superb Fairy-wren  



Superb Fruit-dove
Purple-Crowned Fruit Dove 
Canopy level  Fruits
Berries 
March 2017  

24cm. Very rare nomadic visitor, first photographed in 2017. Feeds on fruiting trees mainly in rainforests, adjacent Eucalypt forests and riparian habitats. 
 

Photo courtesy of 
Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment


Swift Parrot   Outer canopy  Nectar from flowering Eucalypts    26cm. Uncommon winter migrant. All birds return to Tasmania to breed in Spring/Summer. They return to the mainland in Winter. The Catchment is one of the furthest points they travel North. Its size is similar to the more common Scaly-breasted Lorikeet. 


 
Tawny Frogmouth 
Frogmouth Owl, Morepork 
Ground level  Nocturnal insects
Worms

Snails
Reptiles
Frogs 
  50cm. Common resident. Found in open forests, woodlands, riparian zones, especially near tracks, clearings, urban spaces, houses. Roost cryptically during the day; call frequently, repetitively during the night. 
 


Tawny Grassbird   Grass layer
shrub layer 
Insects    19cm. Uncommon resident. Requires tall grass.  Best chance in grasslands around reservoir. They perch on grass and sing. Longer tails than Cisticola. Not as dependent on water nearby. 
 


Topknot Pigeon 
(Flock)
Canopy level  Fruits    46cm. Nomadic, moves in response to climate events. Goes where there is available rainforest fruit. Often in large flocks flying high over forest. Came in large numbers to MCC in 2009 as great drought brought them nearer the coast. 
 


Topknot Pigeon  
 


Torresian Crow   Ground layer  Eat almost anything seed
Insects
Pet foods
Human food scraps 
  53cm. Common resident. Can be seen almost anywhere. 


 
Tree Martin 
Tree Swallow 
Aerial  Flying insects    14cm. Fairly common resident. Nests in tree hollows. Can be seen hawking in the sky. Groups sit on power lines and fences in open country and urban areas.
 


Varied Sittella 
Barkpecker, Tree Runner 
Bark of high branches in canopy  Invertebrates  July 2017  13cm. Fairly common resident but nomadic. They glean from tree trunks or branches, moving downwards on trunks and along the topside or underside of branches. Usually in groups. Best spot is forest near reservoir. Have strikingly yellow legs. Very distinctive body shape that makes identification easier. 
 


Varied Triller   Canopy layer  Fruit
Seeds
Insects 
  18cm. Common resident. Found in open forests and woodlands and riparian zones. Best chances near Reservoir. Its call is a ‘trill’. 
 


Variegated Fairy-wren  
And ♀ in photo
Shrub layer  Insects
A small amount of seeds 
April 2014
May 2014
October 2016
 
15cm. Very common resident. The birds feed around the base of small shrubs, and seldom stray into the open. Found in forests and in urban settings. Always on the move through the vegetation.  


 
Wedge-tailed Eagle 
Eaglehawk 
Ground level  Vertebrates
Rabbits
Hares 
  1.1m. Common resident. Found in steep terrain, on tallest tree. Can be seen high in sky from most parts of Catchment and breeds in the Catchment. Hunts in woodlands and grasslands. 


 
Welcome Swallow 
Australian or House Swallow 
Aerial  Flying insects  December 2015  15cm. Common resident. Usually in flocks, found easily in the sky hawking insects, or over mown grass on playing fields, or perched on power lines. 


 
Whistling Kite   Ground level  Mammals
Birds
Fish
Reptiles
Insects 
  60cm. Nomadic and a rare visitor. Found in open forests near water, riparian zone. Often seen soaring high above, searching for food. Often makes distinctive whistling call while it is hunting. 
 


White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike 
Little Cuckoo-shrike, White-breasted Cuckoo-shrike 
Canopy level  Invertebrates
Some plant material 
  28cm. Common Resident but nomadic. Found in most habitats. Best around Reservoir. 
 


White-bellied Sea-Eagle 
White Breasted Sea-Eagle  
Water surface level  Fish
Turtles
Sea snakes
Birds  
  90cm. Common resident but dispersive over its large territory. Reservoir is only area of water that can support their feeding behaviour. Can be found near the sea or large inland bodies of fresh water. Excellent flier for its size, brilliant hunter. 


Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

White-breasted Woodswallow   Aerial  Flying insects    18cm. Nomadic. Found most easily at Kenmore Village on the power lines, it has nested in that area during the summer. 


 
White-browed Scrubwren
Spotted Scrubwren 
Dense scrub layer just above ground  Invertebrates
Some seeds and fruits 
  13cm. Very common resident. Found in dense vegetation within two metres of the ground in forests, riparian zones, and in parks and gardens. 


 
White-eared Monarch   Canopy level  Insects    14cm. Fairly common resident. Look for it characteristically sallying, hovering and fluttering around the outer foliage of rainforest trees or trees in the riparian zone. One of the best places in Brisbane to see this difficult-to-find bird is at the Reservoir. 


 
White-headed Pigeon 
Baldy, Baldy Pigeon 
Canopy level  Seed
Fruit 
  41cm. Locally nomadic and highly dispersive seeking fruit trees. Only rarely seen, flies strongly and directly. Has adapted to the fruit of the Camphor Laurel tree. So look for them perched in those trees. 


 
White-naped Honeyeater
Black-cap 
Canopy level  Nectar
Honeydew
Invertebrates 
  15cm. Common resident with some migration movement along the coast. Found in most forest and woodland habitats. Always high In the canopy, difficult to see; best detected by their high pitched calls. 
 


White-throated Gerygone 

Bush or Native Canary 
Canopy level  Insects    12cm. Common resident. Prefers open forests, woodlands, riparian zones. Very distinctive call which reveals its presence, but sometimes hard to see in the canopy. Best place is near Reservoir. 
 


White-throated Honeyeater
 
Canopy layer  Nectar
Invertebrates
Honeydew
Fruit 
  15cm. Very common resident. Found in most forest and woodland habitats. Always high In the canopy, difficult to see; best detected by their high pitched calls. 


 
White-throated Needletail
⚥ Spine-tailed Swift 
Aerial: from near ground to very high (2000m)  Flying insects    21cm. Summer migrant, breeds in Siberia, threatened by loss of habitat on migration route through China. Form large flocks, high in the sky, best seen by floating on back in swimming pool. Look for them in front of summer storms. 


Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment
 
White-throated Nightjar 
Laughing Owl 
Ground level at night  Nocturnal insects    37cm. Resident but difficult to detect. Roost cryptically on forest floor in daytime, on ridges, near bare ground, with rocks, bracken. Seen by walking carefully in preferred habitat by day or watch it swoop above forest clearings on dusk. 


 
White-throated Treecreeper 
Little Treecreeper, Woodpecker 
Forages on rough bark, starting from base of tree  Mainly ants
Other invertebrates
Nectar
 
October 2013  18cm. Very common resident. Easily seen if searched for on trunk of rough-barked tree not in foliage. Its call is very loud and varied, and it calls often in all seasons. It feeds by walking up tree trunk from low down picking ants from the crevices of rough bark. 
 

 
White-winged Triller   All layers  Mainly insects, fruit and seeds    19cm. Nomadic resident. Found in open forests and woodlands and riparian zones. 
 


Willie Wagtail 
Black-and-white Fantail 
Open ground far from cover  Insects  October 2016
December 2016 
22cm. Common resident. The third of the fantails. Feeding substrate is very different to the other two. Found in most habitats. But is easily seen as it comes into any open grassed area in urban suburbs: parks, playing fields. 


 
Wompoo Fruit-Dove 
Bubbly Jack, King Pigeon,
Magnificent Fruit-Dove
 
Canopy level  Fruit (mainly figs)  March 2017  50cm. Rare nomadic visitor. Largest and most beautiful of the fruit pigeons. Feeds on fruiting trees mainly in rainforests, adjacent eucalypt forests and riparian habitats. 


 
Wonga Pigeon   Ground level  Mainly seeds, plus fallen fruit and insects  November 2015  40cm. Common resident. Feeds entirely on the floor of rainforest, open eucalypt forest and quiet gardens near bush, easily flushed with explosive flight. Very strong simple call that is repeated ad nauseam. 


Photo courtesy of Tom Tarrant - taken outside Moggill Catchment

Yellow Thornbill  Canopy  Insects    10cm. Fairly common resident. Prefers drier woodlands, riparian habitats and urban parks and gardens. 
 


Yellow-faced Honeyeater   Canopy layer  Nectar
Pollen
Fruit
Invertebrates
Honeydew 
  18cm. Common resident, but others are winter migrants. Prefer forests and woodlands. Can be easily found in Gap Creek Reserve, where its frequent calls announce its presence there. 
 


Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo   All levels  Seeds of native trees and pinecones
Seeds of ground plants
Insects 
  65cm. Fairly common, seasonally nomadic, in search of seeds. Can be found in all of the habitats in the Catchment, but mostly in the forests where there are hakeas, casuarinas and banksias. 
 
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Common Bronzewing 
Mostly near ground Grains
seeds

36cm. Rare visitor mainly due to climate events. Found in open woodland. Very few found in the Catchment. Best chance is in cleared, open landscapes with seeding native grasses. 
Common Bronzewing 
Mostly near ground Grains
seeds

36cm. Rare visitor mainly due to climate events. Found in open woodland. Very few found in the Catchment. Best chance is in cleared, open landscapes with seeding native grasses. 
Crimson Rosella 
Red Lowry
All levels Seeds
Insects- eg: galls 

37cm. Uncommon resident. The Catchment is at the extreme northern end of it distribution which extends south along the coast to SA. Its preferred habitat is the wetter forests, rainforests and riparian zones.
Crimson Rosella 
Red Lowry
All levels Seeds
Insects- eg: galls 

37cm. Uncommon resident. The Catchment is at the extreme northern end of it distribution which extends south along the coast to SA. Its preferred habitat is the wetter forests, rainforests and riparian zones.